The Badlands

Theodore Roosevelt National Park – Painted Canyon Visitor Center, North Dakota

For our lengthy road trip out to Montana a few weeks ago, we passed through the Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota. It’s a park that I’ve always wanted to visit, but just haven’t had the opportunity to do so just yet. At least this time we actually stopped to take some photos.


Photo info:
Theodore Roosevelt National Park
Painted Canyon Visitor Center
Belfield, North Dakota
May 2021
Apple iPhone 12 Pro

My Road

Big boy – Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

Lest anyone think otherwise, this bad boy owns the road when he gets on it. And – you guessed it – this is from Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, where the bison frequently take to the road and get really irritated by stupid touron drivers really quickly. I think Yellowstone is one of my favorite places in the entire US – certainly in my Top 10 list and probably in my Top 5 list. To me, a visit there always gives me a fresh shot in the arm of all things related to the American West – wood bison, gray wolves, grizzly bears, black bears, bald eagles, badgers, elk, deer, geysers, mountains, fumaroles, glass mountains (obsidian), stupendous waterfalls, amazing canyons, on and on.

We always go when it’s best to avoid crowds, so we generally aren’t impacted by buffalo-jams and the like. Sometimes we even have the place pretty much to ourselves, which is just a matter of knowing where to go and when to do so.


Photo info:
American wood bison (Bison bison athabascae)
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming
May 2021
Apple iPhone 12 Pro

Surreal Landscape

From the summit of Haleakalā – Maui, Hawai’i

Many years ago I accompanied Cindy on a lengthy business conference trip to the Big Island of Hawai’i, and afterward we spent a week exploring Maui. Being extreme introverts, we didn’t do any of the usual daytime beach and surf scene, or the evening dance and clubbing scene – no, we went for nature fixes. And the best one I found was the Keoneheʻeheʻe (Sliding Sands) Trail that began near the summit of Haleakalā and meandered some 11 miles (17.8 km) through the 24,719 acres (100 km²) of remote Wilderness Area.

Wow – talk about surreal! At the top, it’s so cold that you need warm clothes and a jacket. At the floor of the crater, it’s so hot that you need shorts and a T-shirt. And during the climb out, it’s so damp and foggy that you need rain protection. There’s arid desert and damp jungle terrain. There’s wildly colored volcanic processes throughout the entire hike. Critters. Spectacular flora. This hike has it all.

If I ever make it to Maui again, this hike is one I plan on repeating.


Photo info:
The view from the summit of Haleakalā
Haleakalā National Park
Maui, Hawai’i
April 2009
Leica D-LUX 4 digicam