Icy View

The view from Molas Pass – Silverton, Colorado

Yep, I’m still on my southwestern Colorado kick. Anytime we went to visit our place – our little slice of mountain goodness – we would usually fly into Denver (DIA) and reluctantly take whatever the rental car place would give us (they never had the vehicle that we reserved months in advance) – then drive halfway across the state, usually pulling into Silverton by the late afternoon or early evening. And this is what we saw just prior to descending into town – the spectacular view from the rest area at Molas Pass.


Photo info:
The view from Molas Pass
Molas Pass rest stop
Silverton, Colorado
November 2009
Leica D-LUX 4 digicam

Surreal Landscape

From the summit of Haleakalā – Maui, Hawai’i

Many years ago I accompanied Cindy on a lengthy business conference trip to the Big Island of Hawai’i, and afterward we spent a week exploring Maui. Being extreme introverts, we didn’t do any of the usual daytime beach and surf scene, or the evening dance and clubbing scene – no, we went for nature fixes. And the best one I found was the Keoneheʻeheʻe (Sliding Sands) Trail that began near the summit of Haleakalā and meandered some 11 miles (17.8 km) through the 24,719 acres (100 km²) of remote Wilderness Area.

Wow – talk about surreal! At the top, it’s so cold that you need warm clothes and a jacket. At the floor of the crater, it’s so hot that you need shorts and a T-shirt. And during the climb out, it’s so damp and foggy that you need rain protection. There’s arid desert and damp jungle terrain. There’s wildly colored volcanic processes throughout the entire hike. Critters. Spectacular flora. This hike has it all.

If I ever make it to Maui again, this hike is one I plan on repeating.


Photo info:
The view from the summit of Haleakalā
Haleakalā National Park
Maui, Hawai’i
April 2009
Leica D-LUX 4 digicam

Early Morning Ponies

Ponies in the early morning – Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland

The ponies at Assateague Island National Seashore are always a draw for visitors, and we were no exception. Cindy and I had kayaked down Sinepuxent Bay from the ferry landing the previous day and put in at Tingles Island Camp for the night, then woke up the following morning to explore the surroundings before the heat and insects overwhelmed us. Our reward was in the form of seeing the ponies up close and personal in a natural settings, without the normal hordes of tourons clustered all around them.


Photo info:
Ponies in the early morning light
Tingles Island Camp
Assateague Island National Seashore
May 2009
Leica D-LUX 4 digicam